Relevant dates

No submissions are required, but please email John Venable (j.venable@curtin.edu.au) to let us know you plan to attend and so that we can send materials ahead of time and/or afterwards.

The tutorial will be held on June 10 or 11, at Stockholm University’s Kista campus

Description of Tutorial 

This tutorial is suitable for PhD students and other researchers wishing to learn more about DSR. It will give attendees a rich understanding of Design Science Research (DSR). During the tutorial sessions, the presenters will present materials and engage the attendees in discussion about important concepts, trends, methods, and techniques, including methods and techniques developed by the presenters.

To facilitate and learn DSR methods and techniques, attendees will be invited to apply them to their own research or to a potential research topic. The workshop presenters have organized many similar workshops and developed hand-outs and working documents to facilitate attendee engagement.

The four sessions are:

Part 1: Foundations of Design Science Research

The first session will introduce the attendees to the DSR research paradigm and to various concepts, issues, and current trends in DSR, in order to create a coherent perspective on DSR and its relationship to other research paradigms.

Part 2: Designing and conducting evaluations in DSR using MEDS

Evaluation is a core activity in DSR. The Methodology for Evaluation in Design Science (MEDS) extends the earlier FEDS (Venable et al. 2016).

Part 3: Managing risk in DSR using RMF4DSR, TRiDS, and MeRMaiDS

Conducting DSR experiences many novel forms of risk. The Methodology for Risk Management in Design Science (MeRMaiDS) incorporates the Risk Management Framework for Design Science Research (RMF4DSR, Pries-Heje et al, 2014) and Treatments for Risk in Design Science (TRiDS, Venable et al, 2017) into a coherent methodology.

Part 4: Problem analysis and ideation in DSR using CCM4DSR

Coloured Cognitive Mapping for Design Science Research (CCM4DSR) extends earlier work by Venable (2014) to support problem analysis, solution ideation, and design theorizing in DSR.

Submission Requirements/Limits (e.g. word limits, formats etc)

No submissions are required, but please email John Venable (j.venable@curtin.edu.au) to let us know you plan to attend and so that we can send materials ahead of time and/or afterwards.

Facilitating individuals, their institutions and contact emails

Jan Pries-Heje, Roskilde University, Denmark, janph@ruc.dk

John Venable, Curtin University, Australia, j.venable@curtin.edu.au

Robert Winter, University of St Gallen, Switzerland, robert.winter@unisg.ch

References

Pries-Heje, Jan, John R. Venable, and Richard L. Baskerville (2014) “RMF4DSR: A Risk Management Framework for Design Science Research”, Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, Vol. 26, Issue 1 (30 June 2014), Article 3, available at http://aisel.aisnet.org/sjis/vol26/iss1/3.

Venable, John R. (2014) “Using Coloured Cognitive Mapping (CCM) for Design Science Research”, Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Design Science Research in Information Systems and Technology (DESRIST 2014), Monica Chiarini Tremblay, Debra VanderMeer, Marcus Rothenberger, Ashish Gupta, and Victoria Yoon (eds.), Miami, FL, USA, 22-23 May 2014, Springer, Berlin, Germany, pp. 345-359 (nominated for best paper).

Venable, John R., Jan Pries-Heje, and Richard Baskerville (2016) “FEDS: A Framework for Evaluation in Design Science Research”, European Journal of Information Systems, forthcoming, advance online EJIS open-access publication available at http://www.palgrave-journals.com/doifinder/10.1057/ejis.2014.36.

Venable, John R., Jan vom Brocke, and Robert Winter (2017) “TRiDS: Treatments for Risks in Design Science”, Proceedings of the 28th Australasian Conference in Information Systems (ACIS 2017), Marta Indulska, Kai Riemer, and Virpi Tuunainen (eds.), University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 4-6 December, 2017.